FAQs

Questions
05.24.2006 What is WikiTeach?
05.24.2006 Is WikiTeach free?
05.24.2006 Do I have to log in?
05.24.2006 How do I add a lesson plan to WikiTeach?
05.24.2006 How do I create a link to a lesson plan that's already on the internet?
03.06.2006 What should I post on WikiTeach?
03.24.2006 If I post a lesson plan, does it still belong to me?
03.24.2006 Can I post other people's lesson plans?
05.15.2006 What format should I use for my lesson plan?
03.24.2006 Can I post advertisements or endorsements?
03.24.2006 Can I use the lesson plans as a message board?
03.24.2006 What should I do if I see something wrong with a lesson plan?
03.30.2006 Does WikiTeach sell or share my information?
03.06.2006 Can I upload Word documents or images?
05.24.2006 WikiTeach Mission Statement
05.24.2006 Who is Jason Galvin?
03.06.2006 Who is Chris Fallis?
 
Answers
Q: What is WikiTeach?
A: WikiTeach is a free library of lesson plans. Several qualities make WikiTeach unique: first you can post your own lesson plans to the site; second the lesson plans are searchable by keyword, subject and grade level; third the lessons are free for all.
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Q: Is WikiTeach free?
A: Yes. Anyone can use and create lesson plans for free.
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Q: Do I have to log in?
A: No.
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Q: How do I add a lesson plan to WikiTeach?
A: Click "Create a Lesson," and agree to the terms and conditions. You can add your own lesson plan, or you can link to a lesson plan that's hosted somewhere else. Enter a title and at least one subject. You can enter up to five subjects, and we encourage you to use all five. Include a very general subject, such as math or art, and some specific subjects, such as equations or Picasso. Try to think of any subject, category or topic your lesson plan could fit into. The more subjects you enter, the easier it will be for people to find your lesson. Next you have to enter a grade range. Just use your best judgment on this one. Finally, enter the text of your lesson plan. You'll have to type it or paste it in, because we don't allow uploading of files. Don't forget to save your lesson before you leave the page. Once you've saved it, please verify that it is in working order: do a search and make sure it shows up in your search; click on any links you added, to make sure they work.
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Q: How do I create a link to a lesson plan that's already on the internet?
A: Click on "Create a Lesson," and agree to the terms and conditions and then click "Link to Lesson Plan." Enter a title and at least one subject. You can enter up to five subjects, and we encourage you to use all five. Include a very general subject, such as math or art, and some specific subjects, such as equations or Picasso. Try to think of any subject, category or topic your lesson plan could fit into. The more subjects you enter, the easier it will be for people to find the lesson. However, you don't need to enter words that are already in the title. Enter a grade range and a web address. You don't need to include http:// because it's already there. Don't forget to save your link before you leave the page. Please test your link after you save the page to make sure it works.
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Q: What should I post on WikiTeach?
A: Please post lesson plans, teaching content, tips for teachers, exams, quizzes, homework, classwork and ideas. Please don't post any content that doesn't belong to you. If you see good lesson plans that are already on the internet, you can just post a link on this site. Do not post any advertisements or endorsements.
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Q: If I post a lesson plan, does it still belong to me?
A: The lesson plans on this site belong to everybody. By posting content to WikiTeach, you are granting a share-alike full copyleft license on that content. A copyleft license uses copyright law in order to ensure that every person who receives a copy or derived version of a work can use, modify, and also redistribute both the work, and derived versions of the work. A full copyleft license imposes the requirement that any freedom that is granted regarding the original work or its copies, must be granted on exactly the same terms in any derived work. It belongs to everyone and no one.
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Q: Can I post other people's lesson plans?
A: No, but you can link to lessons that are hosted elsewhere on the internet.
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Q: What format should I use for my lesson plan?
A: Feel free to create your lesson plan in any style you like. However seven or eight steps are customary:

Step 1. Purpose:
Why are you teaching this? How does it benefit the students?

Step 2. Objective:
What is the specific piece of knowledge you wish to convey? This must be verifiable through examination or performance activity.

Step 3. Anticipatory Set:
Give the students something that will get their minds on topic. Ask them a question that applies to their lives and also to the lesson. The strength of your anticipatory set can greatly affect the outcome of your lesson.

Step 4. Presentation:
Stand and deliver. This is the heart of a traditional lecture classroom. Show and tell your students what you want them to know. Let them see you doing it.

Alternate Step 4. Discovery:
Many schools now emphasize a learner-centered environment, where students are guided toward discovering knowledge, rather than being told what to do. If you use discovery instead of presentation, you have to give students manageable tasks that lead them to the knowledge you're trying to convey.

Step 5. Guided Practice:
Students work through problems with maximum guidance from the instructor.

Step 6. Independent Practice:
Students work through problems with minimal guidance from the instructor.

Step 7. Check for Understanding (CFU):
Verify student learning as stated in Step 2. Tests and quizzes are the traditional methods of CFU, but performance acivities can be just as valid -- sometimes more valid. Asking students, "Do you understand?" is not sufficient for Step 7. That will get you a general idea of student proficiency, but it is not verifiable. Instead, give a brief task for students to complete. If they perform well, you can move on. Otherwise, you have to back up and review the missing link -- or even reteach entirely. Try a different approach, and then CFU again.

Step 8. Reflection:
How well did your lesson work? What could you do better next time? Keep a journal of your reflections. This can be tedious, especially when you're already overworked, but it will accelerate your mastery of the teaching craft.

Additional things to consider are:
How much time does this lesson take?
What materials are needed?
What background knowledge do students need?

Follow this link to a general Wikipedia article about lesson plans
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesson_plan
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Q: Can I post advertisements or endorsements?
A: No!
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Q: Can I use the lesson plans as a message board?
A: No!
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Q: What should I do if I see something wrong with a lesson plan?
A: You can change it directly or contact us.
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Q: Does WikiTeach sell or share my information?
A: Absolutely not. We only use your login information to administer this site. We despise sites that farm personal information.
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Q: Can I upload Word documents or images?
A: Not yet.
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Q: WikiTeach Mission Statement
A: WikiTeach provides free educational content. Our primary goal is to maintain a free library of lesson plans to be shared alike by everybody.
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Q: Who is Jason Galvin?
A: Jason is a web developer and owner of Galvix.com. He built WikiTeach and he can create innovative solutions to your online needs.
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Q: Who is Chris Fallis?
A: Chris is a teacher and all-around curious person. He wished for a site like this, and thankfully, his excellent friend Jason was willing to build it.
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