Music Across the Planet

Created by: guest     Modified by: heymikethere

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Subjects: Music, Anthropology, Culture

For students of 7th to graduate grade.

Objective: students will learn to compare and contrast cultures by analyzing world music.

Intro Set: play similar music from 6 different cultures and ask students to write descriptions of the cultures based solely on the music.  An easy example of this parity is in Paul Simon's album "Graceland."  The song "That Was Your Mother" has a Cajun feel to it, but it's played by African musicians.  However it fits well with the Afro-centric songs on the same album played by the same musicians.  You can easily trace the roots of American music and compare it to its origins in other culutures.  Blues and rock, for example.   You can download more African music at www.uiowa.edu/~africart

Discovery: ask the students to share what they wrote and initiate a class discussion.  What did the students think?  Follow up the students' thoughts with actual facts about the music and the cultures.  Give some other examples of music comparison and other cultures.  

Guided practice: set up a few listening stations around the classroom with different cultural music.  Ask students to pick any two listening stations and compare and contrast what they heard there.  Have some reference books available that relate to those cultures.  Students can use these for on-the-spot research. I would also have the students switch listening stations to gather a full understanding if the different cultures. 

CFU: Students can compare and contrast their different styles of music by realting it to historical information about the culture they researched.  Students should describe how music effects the specific cultures they have learned about and how music may be an integral part of that specific culture or society.  Students can create a chart that explains their findings.
Reflection: how did the lesson go? Use the students projects to help you come up with better examples next time.  This lesson can be constantly improved by the work of students.  Let them know that you're using their work.  It will empower them to know that other students will benefit from their work.